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Posts tagged 'Gemhound'

Kyanite

1 years ago 672 Views

Spark plugs, brake shoes, toilets, sinks, dentures. What are we babbling about, you wonder? Kyanite, of course! These items have one thing in common-porcelain. And Kyanite is used to make porcelain. It’s not all beauty and no brains! This beautiful shimmery blue stone is also very heat resistant and is used to make molds for high temperature metal casting. It’s also used in the automotive and railroad industries. Apart from these industrial uses, we are most familiar with Kyanite as a gemstone. It can be used in all types of jewelry and Jay has demonstrated this in his earrings, rings, necklaces and bracelets. It’s definitely one of our favorite stones!

Petrified Wood

1 years ago 943 Views

As you know, Jay uses a lot of Petrified Wood in his designs. You then also know that it’s not actually wood, but a type of fossil where all the trees organic materials have been replaced with minerals.Pretty cool, right?

Madagascar Peach Stone

1 years ago 857 Views

Madagascar Peach stone is a type of feldspar called orthoclase, which makes up much of the Earth’s crust. It forms as magma cools and then crystallizes into igneous rock--granite, for example. The pink crystals can be tiny—less than a few millimeters, but they are especially large and easily seen when found in another rock called pegmatite. A gigantic crystal found in a pegmatite rock in the mountains of Russia measured 30 feet long and weighed 100 tons! Orthoclase has been found within some rocks on Mars and on the moon.

Nevada Jade

1 years ago 1268 Views

Welcome! We’re glad your back because we want to share with you a cool looking nephrite jade stone called Nevada Jade. Jay has designed some new pieces using this unusual stone and he’ll be presenting them this weekend on Mine Finds on HSN.

Turritella Agate

1 years ago 972 Views

Turritella Agate is a brown colored translucent stone made up of fossilized snails and found only in the Green River Formation of Wyoming, USA. Forty-six to 51 million years ago, the shells were deposited in shallow lakes and covered by sea sediment, eventually becoming fossil beds.